who we are

At Heartlines, the Centre for Values Promotion, we believe in the power of story and positive values to touch hearts and transform behaviour.

WHERE IT STARTED

I reviewed my own storyline and recognised that, beyond health, South Africa’s challenges related to the breakdown of our moral fabric. – Dr Garth Japhet, Heartlines CEO

Heartlines was founded in 2002 by Dr Garth Japhet, a medical doctor driven by a passion to transform behaviour through storytelling. Working in Alexandra during apartheid South Africa, Garth realised that treating symptoms would never truly improve the health and quality of life of his patients. 

Together with some fellow doctors, Garth founded Soul City in 1992, an award-winning multimedia edutainment platform. It is still reaching millions today with easily accessible and contextual health and social justice messaging.

However, many of South Africa’s health and social justice challenges stem from a moral or values breakdown. Heartlines was formed as an initiative of The Mass Media Project, a non-profit Section 21 company. The vision was to move people from professed values to lived values, in order to address key societal issues.

In 2006 we produced 8 values-based films which launched our first national campaign, ‘8 Weeks. 8 Values. One National Conversation.’ [link to Projects / National Values Conversation]

Each film focused on a specific value, and accompanying resources supported taking the conversation on that value further in a small-group setting, such as a classroom, bible-study or faith-based group. These films went on to win numerous awards, including the Durban Film Festival and the Banff World Television Awards.

In 2009, we launched the campaign ‘6 Weeks of Values in Action’. [link to Projects / Values in Action] Our flagship was the series and later on the film Hopeville, which won many awards including a Rose d’Or, two SAFTA awards and an international Emmy nomination.

In 2013 we released the film, Nothing for Mahala, spearheading a national campaign on Values & Money.

Our current project, What’s your Story? [link to Projects / What’s your Story] was launched in 2016 to spark conversations around values and race, difference and understanding. The supporting film of this project is the drama feature film, Beyond the River.

As the Centre for Values Promotion, our vision is to be the voice of values in South Africa, and the centre for engaging values-based content. One of early slogans sums it up: “We mobilise people to do what’s right in order to fix what’s wrong.”

In 2006 we produced 8 values-based films which launched our first national campaign, ‘8 Weeks. 8 Values. One National Conversation.’ [link to Projects / National Values Conversation]

Each film focused on a specific value, and accompanying resources supported taking the conversation on that value further in a small-group setting, such as a classroom, bible-study or faith-based group. These films went on to win numerous awards, including the Durban Film Festival and the Banff World Television Awards.

In 2009, we launched the campaign ‘6 Weeks of Values in Action’. [link to Projects / Values in Action] Our flagship was the series and later on the film Hopeville, which won many awards including a Rose d’Or, two SAFTA awards and an international Emmy nomination.

In 2013 we released the film, Nothing for Mahala, spearheading a national campaign on Values & Money.

Our current project, What’s your Story? [link to Projects / What’s your Story] was launched in 2016 to spark conversations around values and race, difference and understanding. The supporting film of this project is the drama feature film, Beyond the River.

As the Centre for Values Promotion, our vision is to be the voice of values in South Africa, and the centre for engaging values-based content. One of early slogans sums it up: “We mobilise people to do what’s right in order to fix what’s wrong.”

Our approach & values


Do you ever stop and think about why you do certain things? What drives your behaviour, your decisions, your actions? The answer to this question lies in the concept of your values, the things you believe are important. The values that you hold are what drive you or shape what you believe about the world. 

If you think respect is important, how you treat or respond to people will be different from if you didn’t think it was important. If you believe that generosity is important, that will play a big role in how you respond to the needs of others. 

Heartlines promotes all positive values. Some of the values promoted through our previous projects include honesty, responsibility, forgiveness, acceptance, respect, understanding, compassion, self-control, integrity, wisdom, empathy and generosity. While we hold a Christian worldview, we partner with all major faith groups.

Our Team

We asked the Heartlines team, “What’s the one value South Africa needs most today?”

Manco

Garth Japhet

Garth Japhet

CEO

Honesty. When people are not honest in their dealings and steal, it not only leads to poor or no service delivery but also it reduces people’s confidence in the country. The end result is greater unemployment, less money for services and greater poverty and suffering.

Derek Muller

Derek Muller

Chief Operations Officer

Trust is the cornerstone of good long term relationships (between individuals, between people and political parties, between people and companies, in families, on the roads etc etc.). And good societies are based on people that trust each other.

Thabisa Dyala

Thabisa Dyala

Human Resources Manager

Brian Helsby

Brian Helsby

Senior programmes manager

Integrity. A lack of integrity destroys relationships, and deprives people of wealth, education, jobs and security. When integrity is restored, business and government will succeed – relationships will be restored; people will be at peace with themselves.

Nevelia Moloi

Nevelia Moloi

Head of Communications

Love, in its truest form, as that will cancel out so many other social ills, such as envy, greed, selfishness, hatred, etc.

Jennifer Charlton

Jennifer Charlton

Head of production

Olefile Masangane

Olefile Masangane

Programmes Manager

Future-mindedness, as we all caught up in immediacy

Pamela Kgare

Pamela Kgare

Activation Manager

Resilience because we are going to need it to keep hoping and fighting for the future of our children

Quinton Pretorius

Quinton Pretorius

Manager Heartlines Consulting

Curiosity. We need to be curious about each other, we need to be curious about what is happening around us (in government, at work, in our families, and our communities)

Zamabongo Mojalefa

Zamabongo Mojalefa

Project Manager

Honesty – it underpins all values important for a cohesive society. If we were honest, firstly with ourselves, imagine what a free life we would all live. If one cannot be honest with oneself, how can one be honest with others?

Staff

Andile Maposa

Andile Maposa

Online Communities Team Lead

Acceptance – we are taught to see divisions from early on in life, which makes embracing diversity hard later in life.

Blantina Matsimela

Blantina Matsimela

Receptionist / Switchboard Operator

 

 

Dimakatso Songoane

Dimakatso Songoane

PR & Communications Officer

Compassion. We are so caught up in our own worlds that we are not compassionate towards each other, as individuals and society in general. It’s every man for himself.

Gosiame Masike

Gosiame Masike

Correctional Services Team Lead

Tolerance. Becoming more tolerant of others will allow us to get out of our comfort zone and possibly expand our social circle. You might realise that you really enjoy someone’s company; someone that you would have avoided if you hadn’t tried to listen to them and understand them.

Hein Perry

Hein Perry

Visual Communications Designer

Better communication, and through better communication comes better understanding. We need to spend more time listening.

 

Jeff Cele

Jeff Cele

Lead Facilitator

Joao Oliveira

Joao Oliveira

Senior Accountant

Cohesion between the different people in our society. We have also lost interest in knowing each other – whether it’s what’s going on with our neighbours or each other in general.

Khani Modau

Khani Modau

Project Assistant

Lonwabo Jabanga

Lonwabo Jabanga

Accountant

Honesty in earning. I think a lot of scandals are related to how people earn their money. That’s why it’s even hard for them to enjoy the money, hence the lavish lifestyles after they’ve defrauded people, to appease their conscience.

Patrick Somatamba

Patrick Somatamba

Office Assistant

Portia Ravhutulu

Portia Ravhutulu

Project Assistant

Seth Naicker

Seth Naicker

Lead Facilitator

Shannalee Doran

Shannalee Doran

Project Administrator

SA needs faith the most. Whether it be faith in a higher power, or faith in humanity, or faith in each other’s opinions and beliefs, or faith in the Government, or faith in what we can do for one another. I believe having faith in one another would be a big step in the right direction, because that is how we learn to trust, grow and become more unified.

 

Shantel Segolela

Shantel Segolela

Activations Team lead

Responsibility. It’s taking ownership for our actions and not blaming the government, parents and peers for the situations we find ourselves in. I think if we valued responsibility more we could possibly alleviate issues such as crime, violence, abuse, bullying, poor performing schools.

 

Zathi Dlamini

Zathi Dlamini

Project Assistant

Share This

Subscribe

To get the latest Heartlines news into your inbox